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  • 13 Jun 2018
      Caring for elderly family members used to quite simply be the role of the younger family members when our communities were more close-knit than they are today. Elderly parents would often live with their adult children in their homes – it was quite normal and grand children would grow up in the same home as their grand parents. But In today’s changing society the situation is very different because the younger generation have often moved away from where they grew up – they go off to university and then make their homes elsewhere often in a bigger town or city. This may not be through choice as some adults are priced out of their home areas as housing costs have increased drastically in many arts of the UK. Do when different generations of families no longer live in the same area communities are much less united. And if you live a long way from your parents who will care for them when they get older and less able to cope on their own? People are living to a much older age now thanks to medical advances and an awareness of leading a healthy lifestyle – they are much more active than earlier generations – well into their 70's and 80's often. The downside to living a longer life is that these elderly people often require care with everyday tasks. Medically they might be quite well but bodies still get older and are less able to climb the stairs or perform simple tasks like bathing or cooking and cleaning. As well as physical limitations many elderly people suffer from Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia, which can have a serious effect on a person’s ability to look after themselves. Be pro-active about care options It is a good idea to look into care options sooner rather than later – don't wait until there is a crisis situation when you will have to make a quick decision which may not necessarily be the best decision for your elderly relative. Many illnesses that affect mobility and other functions reveal symptoms and can be diagnosed long before they become a problem so it is possible to plan for care well in advance. And it is certainly possible to raise the issue and have afrank discussion about it with your relative – it's just that most people tend not to. Yet elderly relatives may want to be involved in researching care options – they may not even be aware that there are alternatives to the typical residential care home. How many people, for example, know that you can have a live-in carer come and live in your own home and look after you there? This is called home care or live in care and the people who choose this as a career find that becoming a carer is more rewarding than working in a residential care home. Live-in care or home care means that a person can stay in familiar surroundings, with all their own possessions; they can keep any pets they may have and will remain close to friends and neighbours. They can eat when they like and what they like – sit in their own garden and even work in their own garden if their health is up to it. Live-in care is a little know option but a life-changing one for many elderly people.
    161 Posted by Anna Preston
  • 13 Jun 2018
      The first thing most people assume about caring for the elderly when they can no longer manage on their own is that the main option is a residential care homes. Elderly people often feel they will be “shipped off” to a communal home and have to leave all their valued possessions behind and live their final days in one room. Residential care home can be very nice with lovely communal areas and gardens but nevertheless they are still not the same as your own home with friends and neighbours nearby. And if you have a pet you certainly won't be able to take a pet to a care home. But there is another, increasingly popular option, and that is live-in care of home care as it is sometimes known. Live-in care or homecare is just one of a range of care services available in the UK for old people so it is good to be aware of what all the care options are so when the time comes and you or your elderly relative requires help then the right choice can be made. Residential care homes Care homes are most well-known type of care available in the UK for senior people who need help with the everyday tasks of life. There is a wide range of care homes across the UK varying in size, type and cost so there is something to suit all budgets. Care homes can be a good choice for many people as it provides a type of community with shared activities and being able to eat in communal dining rooms. They may also be the best option for people who need high levels of care, especially when nursing care is required or when there are particular needs such as for dementia sufferers. Live-in care Live-in care or homecare, as it is also known, is a care option that is only just starting to become more widely known although it has been around for many years. One of the main advantages of live-in care is that the person being cared for remains in their family home, which is often a place they have lived for many, many years with all its valued possessions and treasured memories. Live-in care is a suitable option even when someone requires specialist nursing care as the live-in carer can organise other help to come to the house as required. A live-in carer moves into the family home and caters for all care needs but also provides companionship and a sense of security for the elderly person. Those who are becoming a carer as their career are well-trained to offer stability and consistency that can quite simply mean the elderly person is happier and more relaxed and many a firm friendship has been forged with a carer. It is much easier for a live-in carer to know the likes and dislikes of the elderly person as they can focus all their attention on caring for that one person, which is very unlike what happens in care homes.
    145 Posted by Anna Preston
  • 06 Aug 2019
    Find out about an amazing care role you can do that provides great personal benefits, whilst enabling an elderly person to remain in their own home.   Are you looking for the kind of career that makes you feel like you have made a difference in the world? Are you looking for a job that is as challenging as it is rewarding? Would you love to work in the kind of job that enables you to apply your training properly without time constraints or budget issues?   Perhaps it is time to start looking into live-in care.   A live-in carer provides elderly care in the clients home. The level of care provided depends on the support that the client needs. In one job you may be providing basic care and companionship, helping with person tasks and otherwise being on hand for support. In another job you could be accompanying your client whilst they go on holiday, and otherwise provide them with help with personal tasks, gardening, cooking and cleaning. Jobs may be long-term or short-term and you can provide live-in care as part of a rota with another carer (2 weeks on 2 weeks off).   The Benefits For The Client There are many benefits to a client having live-in care. The primary benefit is that they get to live in their own home, rather than moving to a residential home. 97% of people would rather not go into residential care if they become unwell or unable to care for themselves. Receiving care at home means they can stay in the place they love the most. Other benefits include: Companionship - 1.9 million older people in the UK feel ignored or invisible. Having a live-in carer helps to combat loneliness by providing immediate company and supporting mobility and independence. Nutrition and help with cooking Physiotherapy if needed Specialist care for stroke recovery or dementia Safety in the home Peace of mind for the family of the client Being able to stay with a partner Being able to keep a pet   There are many more benefits, and often ones that surprise you with every new client who has their own individual needs for live-in care.   The Benefits For You Being a live-in care is incredibly rewarding and you are making a huge difference to your clients life by supporting them at home. Other benefits of being a live-in carer include:   Saving money on household bills whilst you live in the home of your client Free and frequent training from your live-in care agency Often there is no need for qualifications to get the job (you won't be placed until you have been trained) Great pay The opportunity to travel (in some jobs) A good opportunity to apply the skills you have been taught without time restrictions or budget restrictions   There are many more benefits to being a live-in carer, many of which you find out for yourself during your placements. How To Get A Job In Live-in Care Do some research and have a look at the pay, the type of tasks you will need to do, and the type of person you need to be to be great at this kind of job. Not just anyone can be a carer, you have to be very special and very compassionate, with a real need to make a difference in a person's life. If you are already a carer in a residential home, then moving into live-in care could be an amazing next step for you. Take a look at live-in care and how it could benefit you and those you work with. It could be the best career decision you ever make.
    134 Posted by Anna Preston
  • 06 Aug 2019
    Dementia is a symptom of a number of illnesses characterised by a degradation in brain function. Here are some other facts and figures about the condition.   Research by the live-in care hub shows that dementia is now more feared than cancer. The study found that 34% of all adults fear suffering from the condition in later life, although more than half (52%) are now more comfortable talking about the condition than they were ten years ago.   With the total number of people with dementia set to rise by 38% over the next 15 years it’s vitally important that you talk to your family now, rather than later, about your wishes should dementia strike – especially if there is a family history of the condition.   What is dementia? Dementia is a symptom, not an illness. It can be caused by various illnesses, of which Alzheimer’s is the most common and thus well-known. Other forms include vascular dementia and dementia with Lewy bodies.   The precise direction dementia takes depends on the underlying cause but symptoms may include:   failure to recognise familiar people or situations disorientation mood changes hallucinations, delusions or “living in the past” reduced ability to care for oneself language loss, difficulty following a conversation or television programme memory loss, especially very short term memory   Caring for someone with dementia By 2037 the number of carers will have to have risen to 9 million to cope with rising numbers of sufferers. Currently more than 520,000 people have dementia caused by Alzheimers alone, and around 850,000 people have some form of dementia.   Sufferers of dementia respond well to highly individualised care. One sufferer may be perfectly capable of performing daily tasks – but be unable to look after themselves because their short term memory is so badly affected they cannot finish a task once started. Another may have difficulty with spatial awareness, making moving around their home difficult.   Familiarity can be important to people with dementia, and moving to a care home can be extremely unsettling.  Live in care or homecare services provided by a specialist carer trained in dementia care can be extremely beneficial, allowing the elderly person to maintain a high degree of independence. Keeping active and socialising can be extremely beneficial to people with dementia but it can be difficult for sufferers to do so without support from their family or a live-in carer. Not just a part of ageing Dementia is a specific type of brain damage and not an inevitable part of the ageing process. In fact, around 42,000 people are diagnosed with it before the age of 65. As the disease progresses you will lose your ability to think rationally so it is important to discuss your future with your family as soon as possible. Even if you don’t think there is a problem you should talk to your loved ones so that financial planning can start to support your care in the future. Ensuring that your family is aware of your wishes as regards where you live and who cares for you while you still have full mental capacity will improve your quality of care in the future.
    110 Posted by Anna Preston
Family & Home 56 views Aug 09, 2018
How To Pack Shoes For Self Storage Or Moving House

Find out how to pack shoes for moving house or self storage so they remain undamaged and in great condition until you need access to them again.

Some people only have one or two pairs of shoes, some people have hundreds. If you have hundreds of pairs of shoes, or even just 20 or more pairs, you may well find that you need to take special care packing them up for moving house, or for self storage. This is particularly true of expensive or designer shoes, which you really do want to protect so that they maintain their value.

How To Pack Your Shoes

Padding

The key to protecting shoes when packing them away is to use lots of protective padding. It is a great idea to use thick boxes that protect the contents, and then padding to keep the shoes shape. You'll place this padding inside the shoe to ensure it stays in the right shape and doesn't bend in on itself and crease. You can use almost anything to pad the space out, but do take care to watch anything with a print on that could leak its colours into your shoe.

Padding around the shoe can be clean and dry towels, bubble wrap or even old clothes that you plan to get rid of. Anything to keep the shoes packed in and protected will work.

Weight

It is a great idea to place the heaviest shoes on the bottom of the box and the lightest shoes on the top. This stops any crushing happening, and helps to ensure the box is balanced well, avoiding it toppling or breaking in the weakest places.

Shoe Preparation

It is important to prepare shoes properly so that they store well. Packing them with mud or dirt on, could lead to the materials degrading. You also don't want to get your shoes out of storage to wear, or out of your box to wear at home, only to find that the shoes are dirty and not ready for wear. Just a simple wet wipe down till help to clean the shoes, and perhaps a full machine wash for trainers that need a bit of extra help.

Keeping It Dry

Of all the things that you can do to ensure your shoes are protected when you pack them, ensuring they are dry is the most important thing. Moisture anywhere near or on your shoes when you pack them could result in all kinds of things you don't want to happen including: 

  • Mould
  • Material rotting
  • Staining

Any packing materials you use, and any shoes you pack for moving house or self storage (see Storing.com) need to be completely dry to ensure moisture doesn't wreak havoc on your precious footwear.

Packing your shoes may seem like an easy task, but it can be tricky to get right sometimes, especially with expensive shoes that really can't come to any harm. Take your time, look up any specific care instructions for designer shoes, and label the boxes clearly so they don't get thrown around and crushed under heavier boxes. With care and patience when you pack, you will keep the whole collection in amazing condition until the next time you need access to any of your beloved shoes.